Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Sewing Basket in Double Weaving

Sewing Basket in Double Weaving

Model 13. Fig. 16 Sewing Basket in Double Weaving



Fig. 16

Material

10 spokes No. 4 natural reed, 512 inches.
21 spokes No. 4 natural reed, 18 inches.
Weavers No. 2 natural reed.
Weavers No. 2 brown reed.
Weavers No. 4 brown reed.
Handle 2 pieces No. 5 brown reed, 8 inches.
3 weavers No. 2 brown reed.

Make a five inch base. Fasten the sides with an upset of two rows brown triple. The sides of this basket are woven in double weaving, one weaver of brown, the other of natural color. Eighteen rows of slewing with two rows of brown triple finish the weaving of the basket. Hold the spoke slightly out and up while weaving. Complete the basket with border described in preceding sewing basket. Handle is made as in preceding basket.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Handle

Handle

Handle



Handle

Place one end of an 8 inch spoke well down by the side of one of the spokes in the basket. Place the other end down the basket leaving about a three inch space between the ends. To the left of the handle place a brown weaver by the side of the inserted end of handle, bring it up over the handle on the outside, and weave three twists around the handle about an inch apart; bring the weaver over the handle to the inside of basket, down under the triple and out to the front. Follow the twist around the handle with the weaver until the handle is completely covered. End the weaver by bringing it up from the inside of the basket between the handle and down through the border and triple twist where it is lost amid the weaving.

Monday, December 29, 2014

And weave four rows in pairing

And weave four rows in pairing

And weave four rows in pairing



Over a 10 spoke center, weave in pairing, six rows in natural color, change to brown and white, and weave four rows in pairing, change the weave to natural and complete the bottom which should be five inches in diameter. After inserting spokes for the sides, weave an upset in two rows of wale weave. Place a natural color weaver back of one spoke and weave one row around, stopping at the spoke where the weaving was begun; back of the spoke, to the right of the one where the first weaver was placed, insert the brown weaver and weave around until the first weaver is reached. Continue this weave, first the natural then the brown, holding the spokes all the time slightly up and outward. Do this until thirty-eight rows of weaving are finished, nineteen of each color, alternating white and brown stripes. Finish the basket with two rows of triple twist and the following border. First row, each spoke is brought back of the one to the right and out, second row each spoke is brought in front of next three to the right and in back of the fourth spoke.

Sunday, December 28, 2014

Striped Sewing Basket

Striped Sewing Basket

Model 12. Fig. 15 Striped Sewing Basket



Fig. 15

The following three baskets are given to show how colored reed may be introduced and the effective result.

Material

10 spokes No. 4 brown reed, 512 inches.
21 spokes No. 4 natural reed, 15 inches.
Weavers No. 2 natural reed.
Weavers No. 2 brown reed.
Weavers No. 4 brown reed.
Handle 2 pieces No. 5 brown reed, 8 inches.

Saturday, December 27, 2014

Covering For Small Flower Pot

Covering For Small Flower Pot

Model 11. Fig. 14 Covering For Small Flower Pot



Fig. 14

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 5 inches.
34 spokes No. 2 reed, 18 inches.
No. 2 natural reed used as weavers.
No. 3 natural reed used in triple twist.

Over the 8 spoke center weave a base in pairing, 412 inches in diameter. Separate 34 spokes in groups of twos, and considering each group of spokes as one spoke, insert them in base. One spoke in base will have a group placed each side of it, making 17 spokes. Attach the sides to base with an upset of two rows of rope twist. Work eighteen rows in double weave. The spokes are now flared slightly outward and five more rows complete the weaving.

The basket is finished off with No. 2 Closed Border. Continue the use of the two spokes as one throughout the border.

Friday, December 26, 2014

Place each of the three weavers back of a consecutive spoke

Place each of the three weavers back of a consecutive spoke

Place each of the three weavers back of a consecutive spoke



Place each of the three weavers back of a consecutive spoke, and beginning with the first weaver to the left, place it in front of the next two spokes to the right, back of the next spoke and then out to the front. Treat the other two weavers the same way, bringing each weaver in front of two spokes, back of one and out to the front. Continue this until two rows are woven.

With No. 2 natural reed weave 212 inches, holding the spokes so as to get a very slight outward effect, then with thirteen rows of weaving, draw the spokes inward to obtain the rounded effect. Finish the weaving with two rows of triple twist in green, and complete the basket with the following border: First row, each spoke is placed back of the next spoke to the right and out; second row, each spoke is placed in front of three spokes to the right and in back of the next spoke, where it rests.

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Desk Utility Basket

Desk Utility Basket

Model 10. Fig. 13 Desk Utility Basket



Fig. 13

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 5 inches.
31 spokes No. 2 reed, 10 inches.
Weavers No. 2 Natural and No. 2 Green.

Make a bottom five inches. For the sides insert the thirty-one spokes in the bottom, one inch from edge. Place each spoke by the side of a base spoke. Turn up sharply and with three green weavers, make two rows of triple twist in this manner.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Separate Bottom Baskets

Separate Bottom Baskets

Separate Bottom Baskets


Separate bottom basket: the bottom of the basket is made separate from the sides, the latter being made by inserting spokes between the weaving, after the bottom is finished, and attaching them with an upsetting of three, four, or five rod coils. A bottom with an even number of spokes is woven with two weavers in pairing, or with three in triple twist.

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Match Tray

Match Tray

Model 9. Fig. 12 Match Tray



Fig. 12

This little basket may either be used for holding matches or tooth picks. It is woven in No. 2 natural reed over a small drinking glass, with No. 00 as weaver. When finished, stain in old rose “Easy Dye” diluting the dye to get the tint desired.

Material

5 spokes No. 2 reed, 1012 inches.
1 spoke No. 2 reed, 6 inches.
2 Weavers No. 00 reed.
Handle 2 strands No. 00 reed, 24 inches.

Weave a base 118 inches with No. 00 reed. Turn sharply upward and continue weaving until fifty-one rows of single weaving are woven. Be careful to keep the spokes straight and to weave closely. Complete the tray with Closed Border No. 1.

Make the ring handles one inch in diameter and attach to the basket under the border.

Monday, December 22, 2014

No. 1 Jardiniere

No. 1 Jardiniere

Model 8. Fig. 11 No. 1 Jardiniere



Fig. 11

This flower pot covering basket is made of the natural reed. It may either be dipped in any shade of dye or stained. The one illustrated was dipped in dye when completed.

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 18 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 10 inches.
Weavers No. 2 reed.

Weave a bottom 414 inches. The sides are made by holding the spokes outward until 412 inches are woven. This makes the diameter of the basket 434 inches. To obtain the outward slanting effect point the spokes straight out towards the weaver, and, after weaving four rows turn and hold the spokes slantingly upward. Finish this weave with six more rows. Complete the basket with the Closed Border No. 2.

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Complete the basket with the following closed border

Complete the basket with the following closed border

Complete the basket with the following closed border



Change the reed now to green. Hold the spokes well in toward the center and draw the weaver tightly. Work a band of green one inch and finish the weaving with one inch of natural reed. Complete the basket with the following closed border:

Closed Border No. 3

As in the Closed Border No. 1 and No. 2, run each spoke back of the next spoke on the right and out to the front. The second row is woven by placing each spoke in front of the next three spokes to the right and back of the sixth. Weave each spoke in this way until the row is completed.


Diagram No. 19. Closed Border No. 3

Saturday, December 20, 2014

And separate the spokes with green raffia

And separate the spokes with green raffia

And separate the spokes with green raffia



Weave a center, and separate the spokes with green raffia. With No. 2 natural reed weave a base 312 inches. Turn the sides up and drawing them outward weave ten rows. Change the reed to No. 2 green and holding the spokes in the same manner, weave a band of green 78 inch wide, then a band of the natural color 112 inches wide.

Friday, December 19, 2014

Barrel Shaped Fancy Basket

Barrel Shaped Fancy Basket

Model 7. Fig. 10 Barrel Shaped Fancy Basket



Fig. 10

This basket is woven over green spokes, with green bands about an inch from the top and bottom of basket. Green rings may be made for handle.

Material

8 spokes No. 4 green reed, 20 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 green reed, 11 inches.
Weavers No. 2 natural.
Weavers No. 2 green.
1 strand green raffia.

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Weave the center of this basket with brown

Weave the center of this basket with brown

Weave the center of this basket with brown



Weave the center of this basket with brown raffia to carry out the same effect as the brown reed.

Weave 114 inches with raffia. With a No. 2 brown weaver continue the weaving until a base 212 inches is woven. After the sides are turned up, continue weaving up the sides, drawing the spokes gradually outward toward the weaver, until the basket measures 212 inches high. Continue the weaving, drawing the weaver tightly and pressing the spokes in toward the center, until 134 inches more are woven. The basket should now have a slightly rounded effect. The diameter of basket should now be about three inches. The basket is curved outward in the following manner. Work the spokes outward and press them down toward the side of basket; hold firmly and continue the weaving in an easy manner. When nine rows of weaving are finished, complete the basket with Closed Border No. 1.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Tooth-brush Holder

Tooth-brush Holder

Model 6. Fig. 9 Tooth-brush Holder



Fig. 9

This little curved basket is woven with brown reed over natural color spokes. The border is of the natural color reed being a continuation of the spokes.

Material

8 spokes No. 3 reed, 15 inches.
1 spoke No. 3 reed, 8 inches.
Several rings No. 2 brown reed.
1 strand brown raffia.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Closed Border No 2

Closed Border No 2

Closed Border No 2



Closed Border No. 2

For the first row of this border, place each spoke back of the next one, weaving to the right, and bring it out to the front. For the second row, each weaver is brought in front of the next 2 spokes and back of the next spoke or numbering the spokes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5: No. 1 spoke is brought back of No. 2 spoke, in front of the third and fourth spokes, and back of the fifth spoke, where it rests. Continue in this manner until all the spokes are woven in position. This border makes a decidedly pretty effect.


Diagram No. 18. Closed Border No. 2

Monday, December 15, 2014

Press the spokes with the plier until soft

Press the spokes with the plier until soft

Press the spokes with the plier until soft



With No. 1 reed, weave a base four inches. Press the spokes with the plier until soft. Turn them sharply upward and hold them straight. With No. 2 reed weave the sides 134 inches. With the spokes well soaked, press and hold them in towards the center of the basket. Continue the weaving, drawing the weaver tightly, until five rows are woven. Complete basket with the following border:

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Basket For Spools

Basket For Spools

Model 5. Fig. 8 Basket For Spools



Fig. 8

This basket is woven in the natural color and afterwards dipped in brown dye. It makes a useful holder for spools.

Material

8 spokes No. 3 reed, 14 inches.
1 spoke No. 3 reed, 8 inches.
Weavers No. 1 and No. 2 Reed.

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Basket For Pencils

Basket For Pencils

Model 4. Fig. 7 Basket For Pencils



Fig. 7

The second basket for the beginner is the pencil basket, much like the first, with sides higher and with a closed border. This basket is woven all in the natural color and then painted in gold.

Material

6 spokes No. 4 reed, 15 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 8 inches.
4 No. 2 weavers.
1 strand of raffia.

In a similar manner, as illustrated in Fig. 4, make a base 234 inches. Turn the sides up sharply and weave 312 inches. Complete with Closed Border No. 1.

Friday, December 12, 2014

The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat

The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat

The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat



The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat. After the spokes are separated with the raffia, begin the weaving, and weave until a base three inches is woven, then weave two rows with a weaver of the tan reed. This completes the bottom of the basket. Wet the spokes well and with a plier press them hard and turn them up. With the same weaver continue the weaving until seven rows have been woven up the side. During the weaving hold the spokes firmly and straight. Change the weave now to the natural color and work twelve rows, then with another ring of tan reed complete the weaving of the basket with nine rows. Finish the basket with Open Border No. 2.

Bands of tan, combined with the natural color and woven over brown spokes, make a very pretty effect.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Model 3. Fig. 6 Basket For Mother’s Buttons

Model 3. Fig. 6 Basket For Mother’s Buttons

Model 3. Fig. 6 Basket For Mother’s Buttons



Fig. 6

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 16 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 9 inches.
2 rings tan reed.
2 rings natural color reed.
1 strand of raffia.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Closed Border No 1

Closed Border No 1

Closed Border No 1



Closed Border No. 1

Weaving to the right, carry one spoke back of the next spoke and out to the front; proceed in this way until every spoke is placed in this position. The last spoke is pushed back and under the first one. For the second row of this border, place the first spoke, which had been brought back of the second, in front of the third spoke and back of the fourth spoke. Continue in this manner until the row is finished. Be careful to draw all the spokes tight, leaving just space enough for the preceding spoke to pass through.

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

After the spokes are arranged for weaving

After the spokes are arranged for weaving

After the spokes are arranged for weaving



After the spokes are arranged for weaving, take a short strand of 00 reed, fasten and separate the spokes. Weave 134 inches with 00 reed, then with No. 2 natural reed, weave six rows. Follow this with six rows of blue, then change to natural, and weave eleven rows natural, then with the blue reed, weave nine rows, change to natural, and finish the weaving with six rows of natural color reed. Complete the mat with the following closed border:


Diagram No. 16. Closed Border No. 1 (Part 1)

Diagram No. 17. Closed Border No. 1 (Part 2)

Monday, December 8, 2014

Model 2. Fig. 5 Mat With Closed Border

Model 2. Fig. 5 Mat With Closed Border

Model 2. Fig. 5 Mat With Closed Border



Fig. 5

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 19 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 10 inches.
1 ring No. 00 reed.
2 rings No. 2 blue reed.
4 rings No. 2 natural reed.

Sunday, December 7, 2014

Open Border No 1

Open Border No 1

Open Border No 1



Open Border No. 1

Allow about 612 inches for this border. This border is made by placing each spoke back of the next spoke to the right, and pushing it down by the side of this spoke through the weaving.


Diagram No. 14. Open Border No. 1

Open Border No. 2

Open border No. 2 is made by bringing one spoke back of the next two spokes to the right and pushing it well down through the weaving, by the side of the spoke.


Diagram No. 15. Open Border No. 2

Saturday, December 6, 2014

You are now ready for the first step

You are now ready for the first step

You are now ready for the first step



Make an incision in the center of each of 4 spokes as illustrated in Fig. 1. Through these 4 spokes insert the other group of 4 spokes and the short spoke as in Fig. 1. You are now ready for the first step. Place a wet strand of raffia back of the 4 horizontal spokes; pass it over the group of 4 vertical spokes, back of the 5 horizontal spokes, over the lower 4 vertical spokes and back of the first group of horizontal spokes. Separate the groups of fours into groups of twos by bringing the raffia over 2 spokes, under 2 spokes, treating the short spoke as a separate group. Fig. 2. When two rows have been finished, the third and last step is made by weaving the raffia under 1 spoke and over the next, thus separating each spoke. Fig. 3. After the spokes are well separated, take a piece of No. 2 reed, place it back of a spoke and begin weaving over 1 spoke, and back of the next one, until thirty-two rows of weaving are completed. This will make the mat about 534 inches in diameter. You are now ready for the border.


Fig. 3

Friday, December 5, 2014

Weaving Begun Model 1. Fig. 4 Mat With Open Border

Weaving Begun Model 1. Fig. 4 Mat With Open Border

Weaving Begun Model 1. Fig. 4 Mat With Open Border




Fig. 4

Material

6 spokes No. 4 reed, 19 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 10 inches.
2 weavers No. 2 reed.
1 strand raffia.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2

Fig. 3

Thursday, December 4, 2014

In cutting the ends of spokes always cut

In cutting the ends of spokes always cut

In cutting the ends of spokes always cut



In cutting the ends of spokes always cut obliquely to prevent the reed from splitting.

In splitting spokes, the incision must be made carefully in the center of the spoke. Do not make the incision larger than is necessary.


Diagram No. 12. A Split Spoke

Half of the number of spokes needed should be split in center, and the other half inserted through the incision.

In beginning a new weaver join it to the other weaver by crossing both ends back of a spoke.


Diagram No. 13. Joining Weavers

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving

Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving

Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving



Slewing. Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving.


Diagram No. 10. Slewing

The Sixteen-Spoke Center means sixteen spokes arranged in groups of fours in the following manner: first, four spokes are placed in a vertical position, the next four in a horizontal position over the first four, the remaining eight spokes arranged in diagonal positions, one diagonal four laid over the other diagonal four in an opposite direction. A weaver is placed under the left-hand horizontal group and simple weaving is woven over one group and under another until four rows are completed. The spokes are then separated into groups of twos by bringing the weavers over and under every two spokes instead of four. This may be finished either in simple weaving with one weaver, or by inserting another weaver, in pairing.


Diagram No. 11. Sixteen-Spoke Center

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke

The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke

The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke



Five-Rod Coil. The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke.


Diagram No. 9. Five-Rod Coil

Upsetting. Simply a strong weave used in turning up a basket. Three rows of a three or four coil weave are usually used in making an upsetting on a scrap basket.

Monday, December 1, 2014

Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist Is woven

Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist Is woven

Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist Is woven



Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist. Is woven in a similar manner to the three coil weave except that the weavers are brought in front of 3 spokes and back of one.


Diagram No. 8. Four-Rod Coil

Sunday, November 30, 2014

Sometimes called the “Wale” Weave

Sometimes called the “Wale” Weave

Sometimes called the “Wale” Weave



Triple Twist or Three-Rod Coil, sometimes called the “Wale” Weave. Three weavers start back of three consecutive spokes. Beginning with the first spoke to the left and weaving to the right bring the left-hand weaver out in front of the next two spokes, back of the next and out in front. The second and third weavers are treated in the same way, always bringing each weaver in front of 2 spokes and back of the next one. This weave is used mostly in beginning the sides of separate bottom baskets where the spokes are inserted, and in the ending of baskets. It is a strong foundation for borders and handles.


Diagram No. 7. Triple Twist or Three-Rod Coil

Saturday, November 29, 2014

One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two

One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two

One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two



Three and Two Weave. One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two. This weave is used with oval reed and rush, in making scrap baskets.


Diagram No. 6. Three and Two Weave

Friday, November 28, 2014

Double Pairing The weave is the same

Double Pairing The weave is the same

Double Pairing The weave is the same



Double Pairing. The weave is the same as pairing but two weavers are woven together as one.


Diagram No. 4. Double Pairing

Two and One Weave. Simply a weaver woven in front of two spokes and back of one spoke. This makes a pretty effect in oval reed.


Diagram No. 5. Two and One Weave

Thursday, November 27, 2014

This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes

This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes

This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes



Pairing. Two weavers are inserted back of two successive spokes and crossed between, then under weave brought forward each time and made the upper weave. This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes.


Diagram No. 3. Pairing

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and

Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and

Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and



Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and is the continuation of under one spoke and over the next.


Diagram No. 1. Simple Weaving

Double Weaving, the same as simple weaving only that two weavers are woven together as one.


Diagram No. 2. Double Weaving

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

For no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom

For no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom

For no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom



The weaving of a round mat or basket is begun in the center and woven out toward the end. It is absolutely necessary that beginners master the fundamental steps, for no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom. In order to avoid this, the mat is practised upon until the art of weaving a good center is accomplished.

The following are the commonest weaves used.

Monday, November 24, 2014

The First Lesson

The First Lesson

The First Lesson


Reed is a brittle material, therefore it must be soaked in water before using. The time required depends on the number of the reed used. No. 00 merely dipped in water can be used successfully. Nos. 1 and 2 can be used after soaking in water ten minutes; Nos. 4 and 5 after fifteen or twenty minutes. Either cold or hot water may be used, the hot water consuming less time to soak the reed than the cold.

No. 4 and No. 2 reeds are commonly used together in ordinary sized baskets. No. 4 for the spokes, which form the foundation upon and around which No. 2, as the weaver, is woven.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Which is imported from the Philippine Islands

Which is imported from the Philippine Islands

Which is imported from the Philippine Islands



Hemp, which is imported from the Philippine Islands, may be used as a foundation for raffia and sweet grass baskets.

Tools

Very few tools are necessary in basketry, although, to the basket maker, who intends doing much work the following articles are essential: pruning shears, awl, plier, galvanized tub and bucket, measuring stick or rule, knife for splicing the reed. Rubber fingers may be used. For the dyer, rubber gloves and large earthen pots are necessary.

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors

Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors

Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors



Rush, flat or braided, is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors. The flat rush is sold by the pound, the braided by bundles or bunches. The braided rush makes a strong scrap basket; it must be soaked before using to prevent cracking. The flat rush is used in making smaller baskets.

Straw is used as a weaver, and can be woven either wet or dry, but it is better to dip it in water a few minutes before using. Round and oval scrap baskets may be made by combining different colors of the straw with the natural color.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Oval or split reed comes in sizes 5 and 7

Oval or split reed comes in sizes 5 and 7

Oval or split reed comes in sizes 5 and 7



Oval or split reed comes in sizes 5 and 7. This reed makes artistic hanging baskets.

The flat 38 inch wide is often used in making foundations for sweet grass baskets, and it also makes durable scrap baskets.

Raffia is the outside covering of the Madagascar palm. It is a light, tough material imported in the natural or straw color, but may be dyed in many beautiful colors. It is sold in bundles or braids of from one to four pounds. Care should be exercised in using this material. It is advisable to keep it in canvas bags or hang it in braids in the class room, as careless handling may cause untidiness or tend to disorder in the class room.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

The round reed varies in sizes

The round reed varies in sizes

The round reed varies in sizes from No



The round reed varies in sizes from No. 00 to No. 17; No. 00 being the finest, is used in making the centers of baskets, in finishing handles, and in making very small baskets and trays. Sizes 1 to 5 are used in making ordinary size baskets and trays, 5 and 6 for scrap baskets, 8 and 10 for handle foundations.

The reed comes only in the natural color, but may be dyed into many beautiful colors either before or after the article is made.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

The reed is manufactured from the rattan

The reed is manufactured from the rattan

The reed is manufactured from the rattan



The reed is manufactured from the rattan. It has been manufactured in America for about sixty years. There are a number of such manufacturing plants, among which the Wakefield Rattan Company and the New England Company have made splendid reed. Germany and Belgium give us the best reed, while the least desirable quality comes from China.

The outer surface of the rattan is glazed. It is cut in long narrow strips, and is familiar to everyone under the name “cane.” It is used in caning chairs. From the pith or inside rattan, we get the reed known as oval, flat and round, the latter being most extensively used.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Equipment

Equipment

Equipment. The materials used in making these baskets.


Materials

The materials used in making these baskets are rattan or reed, raffia, rush, straw, hemp.

Rattan is a palm which grows wild in India, Japan, China and East India Islands. The rattan seed is black and corresponds in size to a pea. It is a notable fact that, while growing, the rattan always faces the sun. The shoot of this seed grows four years; it is then cut close. The plant produces almost three hundred shoots which are cut annually. These slender shoots attain a length of from three to five hundred feet. They climb the highest trees and hang from them in graceful festoons. It is interesting to see how, like the selfish pumpkin vine, they crowd out any other plant that should happen to be in the way. By small fibres which spring from the joints, they fasten themselves to the trees, and they hold so tenaciously and have such grip or strength that it requires several men, sometimes as many as a half dozen, to separate and remove them.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Sequence in basketry should be followed carefully with beginners

Sequence in basketry should be followed carefully with beginners

Sequence in basketry should be followed carefully with beginners



Sequence in basketry should be followed carefully with beginners, and although it will be impossible to give in detail all the steps included in the subject, the most essential and important will be given, with many suggestions in models for advanced workers.

In conclusion, just a word to the special class teacher of backward, defective, and the backward or defective delinquents. The course presented in this book may be used in the sequence given or adapted just as is necessary to the class of children taught. Most of the models here demonstrated have been successfully taught to children in the backward delinquent class and have been a means of promoting, mentally and morally, the welfare of the child; directing his miscontrolled energy into proper channels, besides making his school life a brighter and happier one.

That this book may be of help to the basket maker and that it may bring much success and happiness to the reader is the wish of the author who has spent many happy hours in preparing it.

Sunday, November 16, 2014

I would suggest that children be permitted to

I would suggest that children be permitted to

I would suggest that children be permitted to



I would suggest that children be permitted to criticise their own and each other’s work.

The celebrating of the holiday seasons can be nicely carried out in the manual training period when the making of birthday gifts, Christmas trays, Easter baskets, sewing baskets, hanging baskets and scrap baskets can be appropriately introduced. Try this suggestion, and watch the happiness of the child who makes gifts for his loved ones.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Owing to the simplicity of basketry the work

Owing to the simplicity of basketry the work

Owing to the simplicity of basketry the work



Owing to the simplicity of basketry the work is being generally accepted. The child of seven or eight years may make a simple mat and basket and find it play work, while the older child may make beautiful useful baskets and trays for the home.

Originality in the child has full play and should always be encouraged since the field of work in this ground is abundant; and he should never be discouraged, no matter how loose the weaving may be nor how crude it may look: he will soon be able, through comparison, to discover his mistakes and correct the poor work.

Friday, November 14, 2014

The child who works steadily over a basket

The child who works steadily over a basket

The child who works steadily over a basket



The child who works steadily over a basket, and may have it to weave and reweave many times before completing it satisfactorily, is not only receiving a valuable lesson in patience and thoroughness, and gaining much experience which will be of inestimable value later on in this particular work, but he is being trained into an efficient workman of the future.

Basket making, which handwork the children love best to do, not only develops their judgment, makes keen their observation, makes them discriminating, but it has a stimulating effect upon their minds and awakens in them the desire to put forth their best efforts. Hanging baskets, scrap baskets, trays, etc., mean something more to them than a piece of basket work done merely because of its utility. Instinctively they recognize the true intrinsic value of the work and that they are real workers, but also it is the beauty and the surprises in basketry development that has its strong and attractive appeal for them.

Thursday, November 13, 2014

The desire to construct and create is strong in childhood

The desire to construct and create is strong in childhood

The desire to construct and create is strong in childhood



The desire to construct and create is strong in childhood, and here in basketry will be found an astonishing aid in inspiring such desire and in developing constructive ability. Children, especially boys, find it fascinating and it is a work which appeals to them in all their moods; frequently when they are unable to do any other kind of school work they turn with delight to basketry.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Through it can be given lessons in patience

Through it can be given lessons in patience

Through it can be given lessons in patience



Basket work is a valuable aid in the character building of the child, for, through it can be given lessons in patience, perseverance and concentration, while truth and honesty can be effectually impressed on the worker, resulting in the gradual though steady developing of the will power.

Our reorganized school systems show what a specific educational value manual training has, not alone in the manual skill which the child attains, but also in the mental, moral and economic values which it gains.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Basketry is an important factor in the promotion of education

Basketry is an important factor in the promotion of education

Basketry is an important factor in the promotion of education



Basketry is an important factor in the promotion of education. Its wide influence is felt not only in the class room but in homes, settlement work, blind institutions, asylums, in fact in institutions of all kinds. The importance and influence of basketry is being recognized now and the work is being carried on in earnest. Within the past five years it has made a great jump and in most institutions where manual training has been introduced, basket making has attained a prominent place in the training of the child.

Monday, November 10, 2014

Its poetry and its artistry would be a revelation

Its poetry and its artistry would be a revelation

Its poetry and its artistry would be a revelation



Serious study of Indian basketry would serve both as an inspiration and stimulation to better work: its intricacy, its poetry and its artistry would be a revelation, and give a fuller understanding of a people so sadly misunderstood.

Basketry was used by the primitive Indians in carrying water. When there was a scarcity, and careful conservation was necessary, the basket was the article used as a conveyance. Some of the California Indians up to this day use their baskets successfully as cooking utensils, while the bassinet, made out of basketry, was, and is still, used by the Indian to hold the papoose.

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Though the Chinese and Japanese have sent us

Though the Chinese and Japanese have sent us

Though the Chinese and Japanese have sent us



Though the Chinese and Japanese have sent us, for long years, marvelous things of beauty, it is to our American Indian that we owe our debt for beauty and artistry of this industry; for industry it is.

It seems quite impossible to me to write on basketry without mentioning the Indian and his connection with it, for we can very safely call him the master artist of basket work. In its history, and a romantic one it is, the Indian figures first and last. The Indian woman was never satisfied with the materials just at hand; she sought for and tried all kinds, in season and out of season, and she chose, unerringly, the best. Her patience was without limit in her experiments in materials, dyes and weaves, with the result that her basketry is the peer of any in the world. Her sample work was nature and into every line of her basket she wove a meaning symbolical of something in particular.

Saturday, November 8, 2014

Preface of Practical basketry

Preface of Practical basketry

Preface of Practical basketry


Basketry is one of the oldest and most valuable of the crafts. As far back as the time of the Israelites we read of its usefulness in offering sacrifices. Of necessity it was born, and in its infancy was made into simple forms, but very soon its importance to man was so duly felt and appreciated that new forms took shape, and its uses were so extended that the early basket makers vied with one another in producing pleasing work and in discovering new and various kinds of materials to put into it.

Friday, November 7, 2014

The Samoan Stitch Lace Effect

The Samoan Stitch Lace Effect

The Samoan Stitch Lace Effect



The Samoan Stitch (Lace Effect). Baskets that are to be lined are very pretty made of this stitch. It is also very effective combined with other stitches, or as the finishing coil of a basket.

The Samoan Stitch is a modification of the Mariposa Stitch, the only difference being in the space between the reeds and the passing of the thread around the long stitch two, three or more times, which gives the lace effect. The reeds must be held firmly, however, and the thread passed around the long stitch times enough to make the basket firm.

Thursday, November 6, 2014

In analyzing this stitch we find that it is made up of three parts

In analyzing this stitch we find that it is made up of three parts

In analyzing this stitch we find that it is made up of three parts



The Mariposa Stitch (Knotted). In analyzing this stitch we find that it is made up of three parts. It is the same as the Lazy Squaw Stitch with the addition of the knotted effect obtained by passing the thread around the long stitch.

Hold the commenced coil in the left hand and work from right to left, (a) Wrap the thread toward you over and around the loose reed once, (b) then over the loose reed again, (c) and down from you between the stitches of the fastened reed, thus binding the two reeds together, (d) bring the needle up between the two reeds at the left side of the long stitch, (e) cross over this stitch, going down between the two reeds at the right of the long stitch. Bring the thread over the loose reed and begin wrapping again as at (a).

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

The story of the origin of the name

The story of the origin of the name

The story of the origin of the name



The story of the origin of the name "Lazy-Squaw" stitch is interesting. If the squaw was inclined to slight her work she would wrap the loose reed several times before taking the long and more difficult stitch which bound the two reeds together. She would then receive from her companions the ignominious title of "lazy-squaw."

As a modification of this stitch the wrapping of the loose reed is omitted, and the long stitch only is used. This passes each time between the stitches of the coil beneath.


BASKET SHOWING THE MARIPOSA WEAVE.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

This is the stitch used by the Indians

This is the stitch used by the Indians

This is the stitch used by the Indians



This is the stitch used by the Indians in making the baskets which they ornamented with feathers, wampum, shells and beads.

The Lazy Squaw Stitch. This stitch is made up of two parts, a long and a short stitch.

Hold the commenced coil in the left hand and work from right to left. (a) Wrap the thread toward you over and around the loose reed once, (b) then over the loose reed again, (c) and down from you between the stitches of the fastened reed and back to (a). This completes the long-and-short stitch.

Monday, November 3, 2014

A Pass the thread between the two reeds toward you

A Pass the thread between the two reeds toward you

A Pass the thread between the two reeds toward you



(a) Pass the thread between the two reeds toward you, (b) over the loose reed from you, (c) between the two reeds toward you, (d) down between the stitches of the fastened reed from you, and beginning again at (a) pass the thread between the two reeds toward you completing the figure eight. Draw the two reeds firmly together.


BASKET SHOWING THE LAZY SQUAW WEAVE.

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Description of Basket Stitches.

Description of Basket Stitches.

Description of Basket Stitches.


The stitching proceeds along a continuous coil, so that each stitch is passed beneath the stitches of the coil beneath.

For convenience in analyzing these stitches the two reeds may be designated as the loose reed and the fastened reed.

The Navajo Stitch (Figure Eight). Hold the commenced coil in the left hand which will cause the work to proceed from the right toward the left.

Saturday, November 1, 2014

And these marked on the basket

And these marked on the basket

And these marked on the basket



As an aid in dividing the space for a design a piece of paper may be cut and folded into the desired number of sections, and these marked on the basket. These spaces are then filled in without regard to the exact number of stitches required to cover the reeds.

Beginners should make a study of Indian baskets and their designs.

Finishing the Basket. Cut the end of the reed to a flat point two inches in length, and gradually taper the stitching off so that it shows where it ends as little as possible. The last two rows of the basket might be stitched with colored raffia unless it detracts from the design.


BASKET SHOWING THE NAVAJO WEAVE.

Friday, October 31, 2014

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory



It is well to have in mind the shape and design before beginning the basket, as haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory. Baskets can be easily shaped to any desired form, as this depends entirely upon the position of each succeeding reed upon the one below it.

Introduction of Color. All reeds in the coiled basket are wound twice with the raffia. It is important to keep this in mind when putting in designs. The colored raffia is introduced in the same manner that the thread is spliced, by laying it along the reed and sewing over it. When working out designs in color do not cut the thread when changing from one to another, but lay the thread not in use along the reed and sew over it, bringing it out when ready to use it again.


BASKET SHOWING THE NAVAJO WEAVE.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

And by a sharp turn in the thread

And by a sharp turn in the thread

And by a sharp turn in the thread



Splicing the Thread. When a new thread is needed lay the end of the old thread along the reed and place the new thread over it, and by a sharp turn in the thread, wind once or twice over both, and continue the stitch as before. When the ends are firmly fastened clip them off.

Shaping the Basket. Coiled basketry admits of the greatest variety in shape and size, from the simple table mat to the exquisitely beautiful jar and vase forms, while the stitches lend themselves to an endless variety of design ranging from the simplest to the most intricate patterns.


BASKETS BEGUN IN THREE DIFFERENT WEAVES.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally



Splicing the Reed. As the reed naturally coils somewhat take care to splice it so that the coil in the two pieces remains the same, otherwise it would draw apart. Sharpen the top side of one reed and the underside of the other to a long flat point and slip one past the other until the two together form the uniform size of the reed. It is sometimes advisable for a novice to wind the spliced reeds with fine thread, but experience will teach one to do the splicing with the sewing of the basket.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The end of the reed is not sharpened

The end of the reed is not sharpened

The end of the reed is not sharpened



The end of the reed is not sharpened, and must be very soft and pliable, or it cannot be bent together at the desired length, two, three, four, five or more inches from the end, without breaking. It will do no special harm if it splits, however, as it is to be covered with the raffia. Lay the end of the raffia to the end of the reed, along the reed and around the bend, and by a sharp turn in the thread wind four or five times over the raffia, covering the bend in the reed. The two reeds may then be caught together by the stitch selected for the basket, or the "Navajo" or "figure eight stitch" may be used and the other stitch introduced on the second round.


GROUP OF BASKETS SHOWING VARIETY IN SIZE, SHAPE AND DESIGN.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Baskets may be classified as round or oval

Baskets may be classified as round or oval

Baskets may be classified as round or oval



Beginning the Basket. Baskets may be classified as round or oval.

A. The Round Basket.

Draw the sharpened end of the pliable reed between the thumb and finger into the smallest possible coil. Lay the end of the raffia to the point and along the sharpened end of the reed and hold it in place with the left hand. By a sharp turn in the thread begin winding over the reed and raffia to the point. Then shape into the coil by sewing through the center, thus forming the "button" as in the illustration.


BASKETS BEGUN IN THREE DIFFERENT WEAVES.
1 Round basket in the Navajo weave.
2 Oval basket in the Lazy Squaw weave.
3 Round basket in the Mariposa weave
B. The Oval Basket:

GROUP OF BASKETS SHOWING VARIETY IN SIZE, SHAPE AND DESIGN.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed



Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed, sharpen to a flat point. Coil the other end, leaving ten or fifteen inches uncoiled, and tie with raffia two or three times. Soak the reeds in water until very pliable, then remove and wipe dry before using. The raffia may be used wet or dry as one prefers. It may be used in coarse strands for the large baskets or split to any size desired for the finer stitches, but should be kept uniform. The basket sewing requires either the sharp or blunt tapestry needle, varying in size between Number 18 and Number 22. Thread the end of the raffia that has been cut from the tree into the needle, thus working with the fiber, as it is less liable to split. Much of the beauty of the basket will depend upon the smoothness and neatness of the work.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.


Preparation of Materials. Round reeds are sold in sizes from the very fine Number 0 to the coarse Number 8. Hemp cord of different sizes may be substituted for the reeds of a flexible basket if desired.


BEGINNING A BASKET IN ANY WEAVE.
1 The reed sharpened to a flat point.
2 The end of the sharpened reed wound with raffia.
3 The end of the reed curled into a small "button."
4 Splicing reeds by cutting both to a flat point.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes



The material used by the Indians is not available for us but imported raffia, rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes. Raffia, a product of the Island of Madagascar, is a soft, pliable, yellowish fiber growing next to the bark of a species of palm tree. Rattan is the product of a kind of palm which grows in India. It is stripped of leaves and split into round or flat strips of different sizes.

A more instructive occupation cannot be found for children than basketry and its allied subjects. It not only is fascinating in itself, but develops patience, judgment, dexterity and skill, and embodies the satisfaction of making a beautiful and useful article. It is not only an educative occupation for school, but for the home as well.

Baskets are known as the woven baskets made of the round or flat rattan and the sewed baskets made from the raffia and reeds.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Basketry.

Basketry.

Basketry is one of the oldest handicrafts known to man.


Basketry.

Basketry is one of the oldest handicrafts known to man, but it reached its greatest excellence with the tribes of American Indians who wove baskets from the grasses, reeds and rushes which they gathered as they wandered from place to place in their nomadic life. These materials were colored with dyes made by cooking the bark of certain trees and the roots and bulbs of plants, a knowledge of which was handed down from mother to daughter.


BEGINNING A BASKET IN ANY WEAVE.

The designs were not meaningless, but represented by symbols their prayers to the Deity for rain, success to a war party, or a petition for favorable crops. Or it might be they chronicled the victory over a hostile tribe, a maiden's love for a stalwart brave, or a thousand other events of their lives in conventionalized symbolic form. The shape, size and use varied as much as the design.

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture



5. Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture and cluttering with too many pictures and useless and inartistic bric-a-brac, and dust-collectors.

6. The Care of the Home: This topic will enable the teacher to give many helpful suggestions. Assign sub-divisions of the subject to different members of the class:

a. Sweeping.
b. Dusting.
c. Care of bare floors.
d. Window washing.
e. Dish washing.
f. Care of cupboards.
g. Care of book-shelves, daily papers, magazines, etc.
h. Care of sleeping rooms, beds, etc.
i. Care of bath rooms.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

An Imaginary Home.

An Imaginary Home.

An Imaginary Home.


When furnishing a home take into consideration sanitary conditions, use, convenience, economy and artistic effects.

1. Ask pupils to make clippings of house plans from papers, magazines, etc. Study and compare them.

2. Decide upon a plan for a simple house, and have some member of the class draw the floor plans upon the blackboard where it can remain for a time.

3. Several points must be considered in conjunction, that there may may be harmony throughout the house as the rooms open into each other.

a. The color scheme and design for each room. Some samples of cloth or paper to show the exact colors and combinations of colors decided upon.
b. Decoration of the walls.
c. The floor finish or covering.
d. Color of shades and curtains that the outside may present a favorable appearance.

4. Divide the class into sections and assign a room to each section to suggest detail in style of furnishing and decorating.

a. Living Room.
b. Dining Room.
c. Kitchen.
d. Pantry.
e. Hall.
f. Sleeping Rooms.
g. Bath.
h. Laundry.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Depending upon their needs and environment

Depending upon their needs and environment

Depending upon their needs and environment



Every teacher will invent her own method of reaching her particular class, depending upon their needs and environment, using all necessary tact. An outline is given below which will suggest a few topics and one method of conducting the lessons. There are many kindred subjects, such as good ventilation, plenty of sunlight, good house-keeping, etc., that can be brought into the discussions, but the enthusiasm which is aroused is really the vital point of the lesson.

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly



The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly. The design may be drawn upon the back of the cardboard and cut out the same as a stencil, care being taken that the proper bridges are in place. The book-cloth is then pasted on the back. If the cardboard is intended as a framework only, construct a second trapezoid one-half inch inside the other, and cut on the lines. The possibilities for decoration are limitless. A design may be stenciled, embroidered, or worked with any of the fancy stitches upon any thin material through which the light will shine, and then pasted over the back of the frame-work. Fancy silks are also very effective.

When the sections are finished, fasten them together with the passe-partout paper. Lay them all face downward with the sides to be joined placed as closely together as possible, and stick the moistened paper over adjoining edges. Book-cloth or any firm material can be used instead of the passe-partout paper.


A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.

A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.

A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.


Materials: Cardboard; book-cloth or Japanese tissue paper; passe-partout paper.

Cut a pattern of one section of the shade in the form of a trapezoid having the longer parallel five and seven-eighth inches, the shorter parallel one and three-eighth inches and the altitude four and one-half inches. Candle shadeholders are uniform in size being six and one-half inches in circumference. To fit this circular holder, the shade may be rounded out at the top, although it can be used with the straight edge. Cut a strip of cardboard five inches wide, and from this cut the four sides of the shade.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Picture Framing.

Picture Framing.

Picture Framing.


Select a mount of the proper color for the picture to be used, and passepartout paper to harmonize. Cut to the desired size and shape. Cut a piece of cardboard to the same size. Have a glass cut to the size of the mount, also a mat for the picture, if desired. Place the picture in position on the mount, and draw guide lines to aid in pasting the picture in place. Put the two rings used for the purpose of hanging the picture, into the cardboard back before putting the parts together. The rings should be placed exactly even, measuring down from the top about one-third of the width of the picture, and in at the sides one inch. Clean the glass carefully, and place it over the picture. Between the cardboard back and the picture place two or three layers of newspaper. Be sure that the back is placed with the rings toward the top. Tie all together very tightly with a strong cord, passing the cord only around one way of the picture. Cut the passepartout paper the length of the picture and crease it over the edges. Moisten the paper and stick it first to the glass and then draw it firmly over the edge and down on the cardboard back. It is necessary to work rapidly after the paper is moistened. Finish the other edge in the same manner. Before removing the cord, tie another around the other way. Finish the two ends in the same manner as the sides, with the exception of the corners. Cut the passe-partout paper an inch longer than the side to be covered, and do not fasten down quite to the corner. Trim for a mitered corner on the glass side and cut a narrow strip the thickness of the glass, and stick it down along the other edge. Tie a cord into the rings for hanging.


Sunday, October 19, 2014

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches



Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches, which will leave a margin of one-half inch. Put the glue on the cloth and place the pulp board five by eight inches over the oblong. Turn over the edges and finish. Glue the lining paper in place. Place under weight as soon as finished. The front cover is made the same with the exception of a joint in the pulp board. Draw on the second piece of book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches. Draw a line one inch from and parallel to one end of the oblong. Draw a second line one-fourth of an inch from this. Spread the glue on the cloth and place the two pieces of pulp board on the oblong with a quarter-inch space between them, and proceed as before. Both covers can be made with the joint if desired. Punch with the eyelet tool two holes in each cover three inches apart and one-half inch from the edge, and put in the eyelets. Take care that these holes are directly opposite. Cut the paper for the book into sheets four and one-half by seven and three-fourths inches (or four and one-half by fifteen and one-half inches), and fold. Punch the eyelets exactly even with those in the cover. Place a postal-card three and one-half by five and one-half inches on the sheets with a half-inch margin at top, bottom and end, and make two points on each of the four sides, one one-half inch from the corner, and the other one inch. Connect corresponding points by slant lines and cut with a knife on these lines. The outside cover can be decorated in any way desired. This style of cover can be used for a book of any size or shape.


TWO VIEWS OF A POST CARD ALBUM CLOSED AND OPEN.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

A Postal Card Album.

A Postal Card Album.

A Postal Card Album.


Materials: Paper for leaves of book; pulp board in three pieces, 5" × 8", 5" × 6¾", 5" × 1"; book-cloth in two pieces 6" × 9"; lining paper in two pieces 4¾" × 7¾"; glue; eyelet punch and eyelets.


TWO VIEWS OF A POST CARD ALBUM CLOSED AND OPEN.

To be of value the work in this exercise must be exact, with measurements perfectly accurate. The glue is to be used sparingly and spread upon the cloth and not on the pulp board.