Friday, February 28, 2014

Closed Border No 2

Closed Border No 2



Closed Border No. 2

For the first row of this border, place each spoke back of the next one, weaving to the right, and bring it out to the front. For the second row, each weaver is brought in front of the next 2 spokes and back of the next spoke or numbering the spokes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5: No. 1 spoke is brought back of No. 2 spoke, in front of the third and fourth spokes, and back of the fifth spoke, where it rests. Continue in this manner until all the spokes are woven in position. This border makes a decidedly pretty effect.


Diagram No. 18. Closed Border No. 2


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Press the spokes with the plier until sof

Press the spokes with the plier until soft



With No. 1 reed, weave a base four inches. Press the spokes with the plier until soft. Turn them sharply upward and hold them straight. With No. 2 reed weave the sides 134 inches. With the spokes well soaked, press and hold them in towards the center of the basket. Continue the weaving, drawing the weaver tightly, until five rows are woven. Complete basket with the following border:



Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Basket For Spools

Model 5. Fig. 8 Basket For Spools



Fig. 8

This basket is woven in the natural color and afterwards dipped in brown dye. It makes a useful holder for spools.

Material

8 spokes No. 3 reed, 14 inches.
1 spoke No. 3 reed, 8 inches.
Weavers No. 1 and No. 2 Reed.


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Model 4. Fig. 7 Basket For Pencils

Model 4. Fig. 7 Basket For Pencils



Fig. 7

The second basket for the beginner is the pencil basket, much like the first, with sides higher and with a closed border. This basket is woven all in the natural color and then painted in gold.

Material

6 spokes No. 4 reed, 15 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 8 inches.
4 No. 2 weavers.
1 strand of raffia.

In a similar manner, as illustrated in Fig. 4, make a base 234 inches. Turn the sides up sharply and weave 312 inches. Complete with Closed Border No. 1.



Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat

The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat



The bottom of this basket is begun just like the mat. After the spokes are separated with the raffia, begin the weaving, and weave until a base three inches is woven, then weave two rows with a weaver of the tan reed. This completes the bottom of the basket. Wet the spokes well and with a plier press them hard and turn them up. With the same weaver continue the weaving until seven rows have been woven up the side. During the weaving hold the spokes firmly and straight. Change the weave now to the natural color and work twelve rows, then with another ring of tan reed complete the weaving of the basket with nine rows. Finish the basket with Open Border No. 2.

Bands of tan, combined with the natural color and woven over brown spokes, make a very pretty effect.



Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Model 3. Fig. 6 Basket For Mother’s Buttons

Model 3. Fig. 6 Basket For Mother’s Buttons



Fig. 6

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 16 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 9 inches.
2 rings tan reed.
2 rings natural color reed.
1 strand of raffia.


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Closed Border No 1

Closed Border No 1



Closed Border No. 1

Weaving to the right, carry one spoke back of the next spoke and out to the front; proceed in this way until every spoke is placed in this position. The last spoke is pushed back and under the first one. For the second row of this border, place the first spoke, which had been brought back of the second, in front of the third spoke and back of the fourth spoke. Continue in this manner until the row is finished. Be careful to draw all the spokes tight, leaving just space enough for the preceding spoke to pass through.



Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

After the spokes are arranged for weaving

After the spokes are arranged for weaving



After the spokes are arranged for weaving, take a short strand of 00 reed, fasten and separate the spokes. Weave 134 inches with 00 reed, then with No. 2 natural reed, weave six rows. Follow this with six rows of blue, then change to natural, and weave eleven rows natural, then with the blue reed, weave nine rows, change to natural, and finish the weaving with six rows of natural color reed. Complete the mat with the following closed border:


Diagram No. 16. Closed Border No. 1 (Part 1)

Diagram No. 17. Closed Border No. 1 (Part 2)


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Model 2. Fig. 5 Mat With Closed Border

Model 2. Fig. 5 Mat With Closed Border



Fig. 5

Material

8 spokes No. 4 reed, 19 inches.
1 spoke No. 4 reed, 10 inches.
1 ring No. 00 reed.
2 rings No. 2 blue reed.
4 rings No. 2 natural reed.


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Open Border No 1

Open Border No 1



Open Border No. 1

Allow about 612 inches for this border. This border is made by placing each spoke back of the next spoke to the right, and pushing it down by the side of this spoke through the weaving.


Diagram No. 14. Open Border No. 1

Open Border No. 2

Open border No. 2 is made by bringing one spoke back of the next two spokes to the right and pushing it well down through the weaving, by the side of the spoke.


Diagram No. 15. Open Border No. 2


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

You are now ready for the first step

You are now ready for the first step



Make an incision in the center of each of 4 spokes as illustrated in Fig. 1. Through these 4 spokes insert the other group of 4 spokes and the short spoke as in Fig. 1. You are now ready for the first step. Place a wet strand of raffia back of the 4 horizontal spokes; pass it over the group of 4 vertical spokes, back of the 5 horizontal spokes, over the lower 4 vertical spokes and back of the first group of horizontal spokes. Separate the groups of fours into groups of twos by bringing the raffia over 2 spokes, under 2 spokes, treating the short spoke as a separate group. Fig. 2. When two rows have been finished, the third and last step is made by weaving the raffia under 1 spoke and over the next, thus separating each spoke. Fig. 3. After the spokes are well separated, take a piece of No. 2 reed, place it back of a spoke and begin weaving over 1 spoke, and back of the next one, until thirty-two rows of weaving are completed. This will make the mat about 534 inches in diameter. You are now ready for the border.


Fig. 3


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Monday, February 24, 2014

Weaving Begun Model 1. Fig. 4 Mat With Open Border


<h1>Weaving Begun Model 1. Fig. 4 Mat With Open Border</h1><br>
<br>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-014a-04.jpg" /><br>
Fig. 4
</div>
<p>Material</p>
<dl class="list">
<dt>6 spokes No. 4 reed, 19 inches.</dt>
<dt>1 spoke No. 4 reed, 10 inches.</dt>
<dt>2 weavers No. 2 reed.</dt>
<dt>1 strand raffia.</dt>
</dl>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-010a.jpg" /><br>
Fig. 1
</div>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-010b.jpg" /><br>
Fig. 2
</div>

In cutting the ends of spokes always cut


<h2>In cutting the ends of spokes always cut</h2><br>
<br>
<p>In cutting the ends of spokes always cut obliquely to prevent the reed
from splitting.</p>
<p>In splitting spokes, the incision must be made carefully in the center of
the spoke. Do not make the incision larger than is necessary.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-008b.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 12. A Split Spoke
</div>

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving


<h2>Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Slewing. Two or more weavers used as one in single weaving.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-007.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 10. Slewing
</div>
<p>The Sixteen-Spoke Center means sixteen spokes arranged in groups of fours
in the following manner: first, four spokes are placed in a vertical
position, the next four in a horizontal position over the first four, the
remaining eight spokes arranged in diagonal positions, one diagonal four
laid over the other diagonal four in an opposite direction. A weaver is
placed under the left-hand horizontal group and simple weaving is woven
over one group and under another until four rows are completed. The spokes
are then separated into groups of twos by bringing the weavers over and
under every two spokes instead of four.

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist Is woven

<h2>Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist Is woven</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Four-Rod Coil or Rope Twist. Is woven in a similar manner to the three
coil weave
except that the weavers are brought in front of 3 spokes and
back of one.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-006a.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 8. Four-Rod Coil
</div>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Friday, February 21, 2014

Sometimes called the “Wale” Weave

<h2>Sometimes called the “Wale” Weave</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Triple Twist or Three-Rod Coil, sometimes called the “Wale” Weave. Three
weavers start back of three consecutive spokes. Beginning with the first
spoke to the left and weaving to the right bring the left-hand weaver out
in front of the next two spokes, back of the next and out in front. The
second and third weavers are treated in the same way, always bringing each
weaver in front of 2 spokes and back of the next one. This weave is used
mostly in beginning the sides of separate bottom baskets where the spokes
are inserted, and in the ending of baskets. It is a strong foundation for
borders and handles.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-005.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 7. Triple Twist or Three-Rod Coil
</div>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Thursday, February 20, 2014

One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two

<h2>One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back of two</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Three and Two Weave. One weaver woven in front of three spokes and back
of two. This weave is used with oval reed and rush, in making scrap
baskets.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-004b.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 6. Three and Two Weave
</div>

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Double Pairing The weave is the same


<h2>Double Pairing The weave is the same</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Double Pairing. The weave is the same as pairing but two weavers are
woven together as one.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-003b.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 4. Double Pairing
</div>
<p>Two and One Weave. Simply a
weaver woven in front of two spokes and back
of one spoke. This makes a pretty effect in oval reed.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-004a.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 5. Two and One Weave
</div>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes

<h2>This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Pairing. Two weavers are inserted back of two successive spokes and
crossed between,
then under weave brought forward each time and made the
upper weave. This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-003a.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 3. Pairing
</div>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes

<h2>This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Pairing. Two weavers are inserted back of two successive spokes and
crossed between,
then under weave brought forward each time and made the
upper weave. This may be used on an even as well as odd number of spokes.</p>

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and is the continuation

<h2>Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Simple Weaving is the commonest of all and is the continuation of under
one spoke and over the next.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-002a.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 1. Simple Weaving
</div>

For no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom

<h2>For no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom</h2><br>
<br>
<p>The weaving of a round mat or basket is begun in the center and woven out
toward the end. It is absolutely necessary that beginners master the
fundamental steps, for no basket can be well made that has a poor bottom.
In order to avoid this, the mat is practised upon until the art of weaving
a good center is accomplished.</p>

Monday, February 17, 2014

The First Lesson


<h1> The First Lesson</h1><br>
<p>Reed is a brittle material, therefore it must be soaked in water before
using. The time required depends on the number of the reed used. No. 00
merely dipped in water can be used successfully. Nos. 1 and 2 can be used
after soaking in water ten minutes; Nos. 4 and 5 after fifteen or twenty
minutes. Either cold or hot water may be used, the hot water consuming
less time to soak the reed than the cold.</p>
<p>No. 4 and No. 2 reeds are commonly used together in ordinary sized
baskets. No. 4 for the spokes, which form the foundation upon and around
which No. 2, as the weaver, is woven.</p>


Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke

<h2>The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1 spoke</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Five-Rod Coil. The weavers are brought in front of 4 spokes and back of 1
spoke.</p>
<div align="center">
<img src="http://basketry.f1cf.com.br/images/illo-006b.png" /><br>
Diagram No. 9. Five-Rod Coil
</div>
<p>Upsetting. Simply a strong weave used in turning up a basket. Three rows
of a three
or four coil weave are usually used in making an upsetting on
a scrap basket.</p>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft

Which is imported from the Philippine Islands

<h2>Which is imported from the Philippine Islands</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Hemp, which is imported from the Philippine Islands, may be used as a
foundation for raffia and sweet grass baskets.</p>
<p>Tools</p>

Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors

[] Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors<br>

<h2>Is imported and sold in the natural and dull green colors</h2><br>
<br>
<p>Rush, flat or braided, is imported and sold in the natural and dull green
colors. The flat rush is sold by the pound, the braided by bundles or
bunches. The braided rush makes a strong scrap basket; it must be soaked
before using to prevent cracking. The flat rush is used in making smaller
baskets.</p>
<p>Straw is used as a weaver, and can be woven either wet or dry, but it is
better to dip it in water a few minutes before using. Round and oval
scrap baskets may be made by combining different colors of the straw with the
natural color.</p>

Source:  Basketry and Handicraft