Sunday, August 31, 2014

When sewing lace to an edge always hold the lace next to you

When sewing lace to an edge always hold the lace next to you

When sewing lace to an edge always hold the lace next to you



Sewing on Lace. When sewing lace to an edge always hold the lace next to you. Lace may be put on straight or gathered. At the top of most laces will be found a coarse thread woven into the lace for the purpose of gathering. Before drawing this up divide the lace and the edge upon which it is to be placed into halves, quarters or eighths, depending upon the length, and pin, with right sides together, at points of division. Then draw up the thread, arrange the gathers even, and overhand to the edge with fine even stitches. If the gathering thread is not in the lace, put it in and proceed as above. If the lace is to be put on plain hold it loosely to the edge and overhand.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

With the pin across the button

With the pin across the button

With the pin across the button



c. Two-Hole Button Place the button so that the stitches will come at right angles to the edge of the cloth, with the pin across the button. Proceed as with the four-hole button.

Sewing on Hooks and Eyes. In sewing hooks and eyes on a garment it is best, where practicable, to cover the ends with the lining of the garment or with a piece of tape. In sewing them on the edge of a hem or facing turn the edge of the hem back over the ends of the hooks and eyes and hem it down. Where they are to be covered they should be strongly overhanded to the garment first. When covering is not feasible place the hook or eye in position and buttonhole around the top, beginning at the right-hand side and inserting the needle under and up through the hole, throwing the thread around the needle as in the buttonhole stitch. The hook should be sewed down at the point before breaking the thread. The worked loop is often used in place of the metal eye. For this purpose cut a stiff pointed piece of cardboard the length of the desired loop and work the loop over this, when the cardboard can be easily slipped out. The loop is worked from left to right with the blanket stitch the same as the bar of the buttonhole.

Friday, August 29, 2014

Change the position of the pin and repeat

Change the position of the pin and repeat

Change the position of the pin and repeat



b. Four-Hole Button In sewing on flat buttons insert the needle from the right side and back in order to hide the knot under the button. Place the button in position and hold a pin across the button for the purpose of lengthening the stitches. Put in five or six stitches diagonally across the button and over the pin. Change the position of the pin and repeat. Slip the pin out, pass the needle through the cloth only, and wind the thread around the threads between the button and the cloth. Pass the needle through the cloth and fasten securely.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

In sewing flat buttons on coats

In sewing flat buttons on coats

In sewing flat buttons on coats



Sewing on Buttons. There are two important requirements for sewing on buttons to put in sufficient thread, and to fasten this thread securely that it may not loosen from the end. In sewing flat buttons on coats, jackets, etc., place a small button on the under side and sew through it to avoid having the stitches show on the under side.

a. The Loop or Shank Button Place the button in position with the loop at right angles to the edge of the cloth. Hold the button with the left hand and overhand the loop to the cloth. Pass the thread to the under side and fasten.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Double the binding ribbon through the center and crease

Double the binding ribbon through the center and crease

Double the binding ribbon through the center and crease



b. The Open Bound Seam Prepare the seam as above without the bias binding. Trim and press the seam open. Double the binding ribbon through the center and crease. Place the raw edge of the seam to the fold of the ribbon and run along the edge, catching through to the under fold. Tape may be used for binding, but must be basted on first and hemmed down.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Seams may be bound with the two parts of the seam together

Seams may be bound with the two parts of the seam together

Seams may be bound with the two parts of the seam together



E. Bound Seam:

Seams may be bound with the two parts of the seam together, or they may be pressed open and bound separately. This may be done with a bias strip, binding ribbon or tape.

a. Binding the entire seam Place together the two right sides of the pieces to be joined and baste one-eighth of an inch from the edge. Place the bias binding (three-fourths of an inch wide) with the wrong side of the cloth up and the edge of the binding one-eighth of an inch from the edge of the seam, and baste in place. Stitch through the three thicknesses of cloth a quarter of an inch from the edge. Turn in one-eighth of an inch on the other side of the binding and hem it down just above the stitching on the other side of the seam. This method of binding is used on the arm-holes of garments or wherever it is not feasible to open the seam and bind separately.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Instead of with a seam involving several thicknesses of cloth

Instead of with a seam involving several thicknesses of cloth

Instead of with a seam involving several thicknesses of cloth



D. Flannel Seam:

The flannel seam is used on material so thick that it is necessary to finish over a raw edge, instead of with a seam involving several thicknesses of cloth. Place together the right sides of the two pieces to be joined and baste one-eighth of an inch from the edge. Stitch one-fourth of an inch from the edge and remove the bastings. Trim the seams smooth, open and baste flat to the cloth. Herringbone stitch over the raw edge of both sides of the seam. One side of the herringbone stitch should come just over the raw edge of the flannel. The edges must be kept smooth, and unless the flannel ravels easily, the herringbone stitch should be not over one-eighth of an inch deep and close together. This stitch is used also on the flannel patch.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

This is used for joining thin material

This is used for joining thin material

This is used for joining thin material



C. Hemmed Seam:

This is used for joining thin material, lace, etc. On one piece fold an eighth of an inch seam (or more, if necessary) to the right side of the cloth, and on the other piece fold an eighth of an inch seam to the wrong side. Place the right sides of the two pieces together with the raw edge of one piece under and to the folded edge of the other. Baste this fold down over the raw edge sewing through the three thicknesses of cloth. Fold over in the crease and baste through the four thicknesses. Stitch, or hem by hand, along the edge of the seam on both sides of the cloth.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Place together the wrong sides of the pieces to be joined

Place together the wrong sides of the pieces to be joined

Place together the wrong sides of the pieces to be joined



B. French Seam.

Place together the wrong sides of the pieces to be joined, and baste one-fourth of an inch from the edge. With the running stitch sew one-eighth of an inch from the edge. Carefully trim off the ravelings, fold the right sides together and crease exactly in the seam, baste and stitch the seam, taking care that no ravelings can be seen and that the seam is perfectly smooth on the right side.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Place the two pieces to be joined

Place the two pieces to be joined

Place the two pieces to be joined



A. French Fell.

Place the two pieces to be joined, right sides together, edges even and baste one-fourth of an inch from the edge. Sew with the combination stitch (or machine stitching) three-eighths of an inch from the edge. Trim three-sixteenths of an inch from the under side of the seam and crease the upper side of the seam over this. (In hand sewing there is a long stitch on the under side. Be sure to trim from this side so that the short stitch comes on the top.) On the right side of the garment crease carefully and baste along the edge of the seam to prevent the fullness which beginners are so liable to have over the French Fell on the right side. Turn to the wrong side, baste the seam flat to the cloth, and hem.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

A seam is formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth

A seam is formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth

A seam is formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth



Seams. A seam is formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth. There are several different methods of joining them. Those known as the raw seams may be joined by stitching, half-back stitching, overhanding or the combination stitch. The closed or finished seams are known as the French Fell, French Seam, Hemmed Seam, Flannel Seam and the Bound Seam. No garment should be finished with a raw seam, which is only properly used when covered with a lining, or as the first step in one of the finished seams.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Fold over the remaining part to the wrong side

Fold over the remaining part to the wrong side

Fold over the remaining part to the wrong side



e. Fold over the remaining part to the wrong side, baste and hem. Stitch along the fold of the gusset to strengthen it.


FORMATION OF GUSSET.

Putting in Sleeves. After trimming the arm hole, measure one inch back from the shoulder seam and mark with a pin. Fold the garment at the arm hole with this pin at the top of the fold and place another directly opposite it. Call this point A. Remove the first pin to avoid confusion. For a sleeve for an adult, measure from the shoulder seam five inches on the front and mark with a pin. Call this point B. Measure from the shoulder seam three inches on the back and mark with a pin. Call this point C. With the sleeve right side out place the under seam of the sleeve at A and pin together at this point. The gathers are to come at the top of the sleeve between B and C. For misses and children the measurements should be decreased proportionately. Measure the sleeve on the arm-hole and cut small notches at B and C. Gather the sleeve between these notches one-fourth of an inch from the edge, with a strong thread a little longer than the distance to be gathered. Put in a second gathering one-eighth of an inch from the first. Put in place at points A B and C; draw up the gathering threads to the proper length and fasten by winding around a pin. Arrange the gathers between B and C, pushing them a little closer together in front of the shoulder seam. Hold the inside of the sleeve next to you and, beginning at B, baste first around the plain part, then the gathered part. Stitch inside the basting and bind the seam.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Cut a piece of cloth one and one-half inches square

Cut a piece of cloth one and one-half inches square

Cut a piece of cloth one and one-half inches square



c. Cut a piece of cloth one and one-half inches square. On this square fold down one corner three-fourths of an inch on the sides and cut it off. Turn a fold one-eighth of an inch all around this piece. Place the corner which is opposite the diagonal cut to the middle of this cut and crease.

d. To sew the gusset in, place the apex of the triangle to the end of the opening and overhand on the wrong side to the crease before made.

Monday, August 18, 2014

The following are the successive steps for making the gusset

The following are the successive steps for making the gusset

The following are the successive steps for making the gusset



D. The Gusset.

This method of finishing an opening is sometimes used on drawers and night-shirts instead of Placket A. The following are the successive steps for making the gusset:

a. Cut the opening the desired length.

b. Hem both sides with a very narrow hem running to a point at the end of the opening.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Crease both facings open in the seams

Crease both facings open in the seams

Crease both facings open in the seams



e. Crease both facings open in the seams. Turn in a fold on the other side of the short facing and turn the end to a square point.

f. Turn a fold the length of the long facing so that it matches the width of the short piece.

g. Baste the two facings together and the flat facing to the cloth.

h. Stitch around the short facing and twice across it at the end of the opening. Stitch or hem the under side of the flat facing.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Thus having the three thicknesses of cloth together

Thus having the three thicknesses of cloth together

Thus having the three thicknesses of cloth together



c. Place the long facing to the back of this same side with the right side of facing to the wrong side of the cloth, thus having the three thicknesses of cloth together. Pin in place and baste a quarter of an inch from the edge. Stitch an eighth of an inch seam.

d. The long facing is a continuous facing, the same as in Plackets A and B. Baste up the other side and stitch, the seam being on the right side of the cloth.

Friday, August 15, 2014

Cut the opening the desired length

Cut the opening the desired length

Cut the opening the desired length



a. Cut the opening the desired length. Cut the facing in two pieces, one a little more than twice the length of the opening, and the other the length of the opening plus the width of the facing, both pieces to be the desired width plus the allowance for seams. (These two pieces will be designated the long and the short facings.)

b. Place the short facing to the right-hand side of the opening, right sides of cloth together and even at the top. Pin in place.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Baste this facing flat to the cloth

Baste this facing flat to the cloth

Baste this facing flat to the cloth



j. Baste this facing flat to the cloth, and hem.

k. Stitch once across the top facing only, just at the bottom end of the opening.

C. A Finish for a Shirt Sleeve or Nightgown Opening.

As this consists of an extra piece which extends over the opening, it is necessary to allow for this in cutting, so that the middle of this piece will come in the center when finished. When cutting this opening in a nightgown, cut to the right of the center one-half the width the facing is to be when finished. The following are the successive steps for making the nightgown opening:

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

After turning the fold the length of the facing

After turning the fold the length of the facing

After turning the fold the length of the facing



h. After turning the fold the length of the facing, place the edge of this fold to the stitching on the other side of the seam, and crease the facing through the center the long way, as in Placket A.

i. As the right side is to be hemmed down as a facing, it is desirable to cut out one thickness of the cloth, leaving, of course, the quarter-inch inside the long crease, and also at the cross fold, at the end of the opening as the first fold on the facing.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Basketry and Handicraft

Basketry and Handicraft

Basketry and Handicraft


A Tentative Course in

Needlework, Basketry, Designing, Paper and Card-Board
Construction, Textile Fibers and Fabrics
and Home Decoration and Care


Designed for Use in Schools and Homes

Monday, August 11, 2014

This is the placket used on dress skirts

This is the placket used on dress skirts

This is the placket used on dress skirts



B. A Placket with an Extension Hem on One Side and a Flat Facing on the Other.

This is the placket used on dress skirts, petticoats and carefully tailored garments.

Follow the directions for the successive steps for making Placket A through "g," as the two plackets are the same to this point.

The left side of the facing will consist of an extension hem the same as in Placket A, the only difference in the plackets being the manner of finishing the right side or top facing.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Crease the facing back over the opening exactly in the seam

Crease the facing back over the opening exactly in the seam

Crease the facing back over the opening exactly in the seam



f. Crease the facing back over the opening exactly in the seam.

g. Turn an eighth of an inch fold the length of the facing down the other side.

h. Fold this over the seam to the stitching, baste, and hem.

i. At the top of the opening fold the right-hand facing back and stitch along the edge to hold in place.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

C Slip this between the folds of

C Slip this between the folds of

C Slip this between the folds of



c. Slip this between the folds of the cloth so that the fold of the facing will just come to the end of the opening. This will bring the right side of facing to the right side of the cloth.

d. Baste the facing to the cloth down one side and up the other side of the opening.

e. Stitch with an eighth of an inch seam, which will render unavoidable a small pleat at the end of the opening the width of the seam.

Friday, August 8, 2014

A placket is an opening made in a garment

A placket is an opening made in a garment

A placket is an opening made in a garment



Plackets. A placket is an opening made in a garment. There are several ways of finishing an opening, but in all cases, except when the gusset is used, the underside should extend some distance under the top to prevent gaping.

A. A Placket with a Continuous Binding.

This is the placket used on children's drawers, night shirts, under garments, etc.

Cut the opening the desired length. Cut the facing with the warp a little more than twice the length of the opening and twice the desired width when finished, plus one-fourth inch, or more, allowed for seams. The following are the successive steps for making the placket:

a. Fold the cloth, right sides together, in a line with the opening.

b. Double the facing across the warp, through the center, wrong sides together.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Complex and ever-changing styles of fashion

Complex and ever-changing styles of fashion

Complex and ever-changing styles of fashion



Patterns. With the varied, complex and ever-changing styles of fashion, individual pattern drafting (except for a very simple article) is impracticable, usually resulting in commonplace garments and involving useless time and labor. For the trifling sum of ten or fifteen cents reliable, up-to-date patterns can be secured which are cut to established measurements by a fashion expert. A good needlewoman supplies herself with a good pattern and then cuts accurately, bastes carefully, and finishes neatly, and in nearly all cases, results will be satisfactory.

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Turn and crease a quarter-inch fold on both sides

Turn and crease a quarter-inch fold on both sides

Turn and crease a quarter-inch fold on both sides



Mitered Corner. Two hems crossing at right angles may be finished either with the square or the mitered corner. To miter a corner, turn and crease a quarter-inch fold on both sides. Turn the second fold of the hem the desired width on both sides and crease. Open out the corner and place a dot where the inner creases cross. Place a second dot a quarter of an inch from the first toward the corner. Through this second point draw a line passing from side to side, across the corner, being careful that the line is an equal distance from the corner on both sides. Cut off the corner on this line. Fold both hems again on the creases before made and pin the hem on one side in place. Make a pin hole as near the exact point where the hems cross as possible, passing through both hems. Fold in the bias edge on the hem that is not pinned down, exactly from the pin hole to the corner, causing the edges of the two hems to meet at an angle of forty-five degrees.

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Care should be taken in joining threads

Care should be taken in joining threads

Care should be taken in joining threads



Joining and Fastening Thread. When sewing, care should be taken in joining threads. The manner in which it is done depends upon the stitch in use. In hemming, leave a half-inch of the old and a half-inch of the new thread, tuck both under the hem and continue hemming over the threads. The same plan is followed in overhanding. In the blanket stitch, feather stitch, herringbone, chain and buttonhole stitch the new thread must come out through the last stitch. Thoughtful attention should be given to the fastening of threads, as careful, painstaking work may soon be rendered useless by the loosening of the thread from the end. After fastening securely clip off all threads that the work may be not only strong, but neat. The usual fastening consists of several backstitches taken in the same place.

The edges of cloth are known as the selvedge

The edges of cloth are known as the selvedge

The edges of cloth are known as the selvedge



Cloth. A fabric woven of fibers, either animal or vegetable. The edges of cloth are known as the selvedge, the threads running lengthwise the warp, and those crossing the warp from selvedge to selvedge the woof. The selvedge should be trimmed off, as it is hard to sew through and draws up when wet.

Eyelets and Loops. An eyelet is a small hole made and worked in a garment to receive a cord, stud or loop of a button. Punch the hole with a stiletto, pushing the threads apart rather than breaking them. Overhand closely from right to left with short even stitches. A large eyelet may be cut out and worked around with the buttonhole stitch. A blind loop is made in place of the eye to receive a hook. Put three or four long stitches in the same place beginning at the left, so that the thread will be at the proper place for working the loop with the blanket stitch.

Monday, August 4, 2014

A bias facing for a curve should be

A bias facing for a curve should be

A bias facing for a curve should be



A bias facing for a curve should be cut narrow enough so that by stretching one edge of the facing it will lie perfectly smooth when finished.

c. To join two bias strips Cut the ends to be joined straight with the threads of the cloth and place the right sides together, slipping the top piece past the under piece the width of a seam, but having the top edges even. Stitch where the facings cross, open the seam and crease; or, after trimming, a seam may be turned back at the end of each piece and the folded edges overhanded together.

To cut a bias facing.

To cut a bias facing.

To cut a bias facing. Crease in a fold or baste where the facing is to be cut off.



a. To cut a bias facing, bias binding or fold, measure in the desired width on the true bias at a number of points. Draw a line, crease in a fold or baste where the facing is to be cut off.

b. To put on a bias facing, place the edge of the strip, right sides together, even with the edge of the cloth to be faced, baste and stitch. Turn the facing back exactly in the seam and baste along the edge so that the facing will not show on the right side. Turn the fold at the top, baste and hem.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

A bias is a diagonal cut.

A bias is a diagonal cut.

A bias is a diagonal cut. Having the twill of the cloth at right angles to the cut.



Bias. A bias is a diagonal cut. To cut a true bias, fold over the corner of the cloth so that the warp and woof threads are parallel. A choice bias is a true bias, having the twill of the cloth at right angles to the cut. Great care should be taken in measuring and cutting bias strips to have them the same width throughout the length. Also avoid stretching after cutting.

Make the band by turning in one-fourth of an inch all around

Make the band by turning in one-fourth of an inch all around

Make the band by turning in one-fourth of an inch all around



B. Overhand Band.

See description of Gauging, . Make the band by turning in one-fourth of an inch all around, folding and basting the edges together. Overhand the ends of the band. The whipping of the full part to the band will be sufficient to hold the two sides of the band together. Turn back the raw edges of the piece to be gathered one-half inch and gather once, twice or three times as desired. Pin to the band and overhand, taking a stitch for each pleat of the gathers. Fasten all bands very securely.

Saturday, August 2, 2014

A band is a straight piece of cloth used to finish garments.

A band is a straight piece of cloth used to finish garments.

A band is a straight piece of cloth used to finish garments.


Bands. A band is a straight piece of cloth used to finish garments at the neck, wrist or waist. It may be sewed to a straight, gathered or pleated edge. A band cut with the warp is stronger than one cut with the woof.

A. Hemmed Band.

See description of the Gathering, . Gather as desired. Place the right sides of the cloth and band together and baste just above the gathering thread, taking care that the gathers are arranged perfectly even. Stitch just below the gathering thread. Turn in a fourth of an inch at the ends and along the other side of the band. Fold the band over just covering the gathers, and baste. Hem or stitch along the edge, overhanding the ends of the band.

This is a variation of the blanket stitch

This is a variation of the blanket stitch

This is a variation of the blanket stitch



Lazy Daisy or Star Stitch. This is a variation of the blanket stitch. Insert the needle at the point desired for the center of the flower and draw the thread through. Insert again at the same place and take up the desired length of stitch on the needle, drawing the needle out over the thread. Pass the needle down through the cloth at the point where it came out, but on the other side of the loop, thus forming a second loop at the end of the petal to hold it in place, and return the needle again to the center of the flower. Make as many petals as desired and finish with the French knot in the center of the flower. This stitch also makes a pretty star, using six points and finishing without the French knot.

Friday, August 1, 2014

And put in three or four running stitches

And put in three or four running stitches

And put in three or four running stitches



Kensington Outline Stitch. This stitch is used to follow the line of a design for ornamentation. To avoid the knot, when starting begin half an inch from the end of the line to be followed, and put in three or four running stitches, bringing the thread out at the proper place for starting. Turn the cloth around, holding it over the left forefinger, and work from you. Pointing the needle toward you, take a short running stitch directly on the line keeping the thread always on the right side of the needle, except on a line curving sharply to the left when the thread will fall more naturally to the left side. The thread being carried from one stitch to another gives the effect of a long diagonal stitch on the right side and running stitches on the wrong. The length of the stitch will be determined by the size of the thread, and the character of the line to be covered, a curved line requiring a shorter stitch than a straight one.

Working from you instead of toward you as in ordinary running

Working from you instead of toward you as in ordinary running

Working from you instead of toward you as in ordinary running



The stitch consists of single, alternating running stitches made first to the right and then to the left, working from you instead of toward you as in ordinary running. The thread being carried across from one stitch to another, gives the appearance of a cross stitch. The stitches on each side must be in straight rows, with the outer row just over the edge of the flannel. The stitch should be no deeper than necessary to prevent pulling out. A good rule for beginners is to make the top of each stitch even with the bottom of the last stitch. Point the needle toward you in making the stitch, but work away from you. The edge of the flannel must be kept smooth. This being a cross stitch the thread of one part of the stitch is on top and the other underneath. Be sure that this is regular, those slanting in the same direction should be always either to the top or to the bottom.