Friday, October 31, 2014

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory

As haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory



It is well to have in mind the shape and design before beginning the basket, as haphazard work is not apt to be satisfactory. Baskets can be easily shaped to any desired form, as this depends entirely upon the position of each succeeding reed upon the one below it.

Introduction of Color. All reeds in the coiled basket are wound twice with the raffia. It is important to keep this in mind when putting in designs. The colored raffia is introduced in the same manner that the thread is spliced, by laying it along the reed and sewing over it. When working out designs in color do not cut the thread when changing from one to another, but lay the thread not in use along the reed and sew over it, bringing it out when ready to use it again.


BASKET SHOWING THE NAVAJO WEAVE.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

And by a sharp turn in the thread

And by a sharp turn in the thread

And by a sharp turn in the thread



Splicing the Thread. When a new thread is needed lay the end of the old thread along the reed and place the new thread over it, and by a sharp turn in the thread, wind once or twice over both, and continue the stitch as before. When the ends are firmly fastened clip them off.

Shaping the Basket. Coiled basketry admits of the greatest variety in shape and size, from the simple table mat to the exquisitely beautiful jar and vase forms, while the stitches lend themselves to an endless variety of design ranging from the simplest to the most intricate patterns.


BASKETS BEGUN IN THREE DIFFERENT WEAVES.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally

Splicing the Reed As the reed naturally



Splicing the Reed. As the reed naturally coils somewhat take care to splice it so that the coil in the two pieces remains the same, otherwise it would draw apart. Sharpen the top side of one reed and the underside of the other to a long flat point and slip one past the other until the two together form the uniform size of the reed. It is sometimes advisable for a novice to wind the spliced reeds with fine thread, but experience will teach one to do the splicing with the sewing of the basket.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The end of the reed is not sharpened

The end of the reed is not sharpened

The end of the reed is not sharpened



The end of the reed is not sharpened, and must be very soft and pliable, or it cannot be bent together at the desired length, two, three, four, five or more inches from the end, without breaking. It will do no special harm if it splits, however, as it is to be covered with the raffia. Lay the end of the raffia to the end of the reed, along the reed and around the bend, and by a sharp turn in the thread wind four or five times over the raffia, covering the bend in the reed. The two reeds may then be caught together by the stitch selected for the basket, or the "Navajo" or "figure eight stitch" may be used and the other stitch introduced on the second round.


GROUP OF BASKETS SHOWING VARIETY IN SIZE, SHAPE AND DESIGN.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Baskets may be classified as round or oval

Baskets may be classified as round or oval

Baskets may be classified as round or oval



Beginning the Basket. Baskets may be classified as round or oval.

A. The Round Basket.

Draw the sharpened end of the pliable reed between the thumb and finger into the smallest possible coil. Lay the end of the raffia to the point and along the sharpened end of the reed and hold it in place with the left hand. By a sharp turn in the thread begin winding over the reed and raffia to the point. Then shape into the coil by sewing through the center, thus forming the "button" as in the illustration.


BASKETS BEGUN IN THREE DIFFERENT WEAVES.
1 Round basket in the Navajo weave.
2 Oval basket in the Lazy Squaw weave.
3 Round basket in the Mariposa weave
B. The Oval Basket:

GROUP OF BASKETS SHOWING VARIETY IN SIZE, SHAPE AND DESIGN.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed

Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed



Beginning about two inches from one end of the reed, sharpen to a flat point. Coil the other end, leaving ten or fifteen inches uncoiled, and tie with raffia two or three times. Soak the reeds in water until very pliable, then remove and wipe dry before using. The raffia may be used wet or dry as one prefers. It may be used in coarse strands for the large baskets or split to any size desired for the finer stitches, but should be kept uniform. The basket sewing requires either the sharp or blunt tapestry needle, varying in size between Number 18 and Number 22. Thread the end of the raffia that has been cut from the tree into the needle, thus working with the fiber, as it is less liable to split. Much of the beauty of the basket will depend upon the smoothness and neatness of the work.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.

General Directions For Making The Coil Basket.


Preparation of Materials. Round reeds are sold in sizes from the very fine Number 0 to the coarse Number 8. Hemp cord of different sizes may be substituted for the reeds of a flexible basket if desired.


BEGINNING A BASKET IN ANY WEAVE.
1 The reed sharpened to a flat point.
2 The end of the sharpened reed wound with raffia.
3 The end of the reed curled into a small "button."
4 Splicing reeds by cutting both to a flat point.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes

Rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes



The material used by the Indians is not available for us but imported raffia, rattan and rushes form excellent substitutes. Raffia, a product of the Island of Madagascar, is a soft, pliable, yellowish fiber growing next to the bark of a species of palm tree. Rattan is the product of a kind of palm which grows in India. It is stripped of leaves and split into round or flat strips of different sizes.

A more instructive occupation cannot be found for children than basketry and its allied subjects. It not only is fascinating in itself, but develops patience, judgment, dexterity and skill, and embodies the satisfaction of making a beautiful and useful article. It is not only an educative occupation for school, but for the home as well.

Baskets are known as the woven baskets made of the round or flat rattan and the sewed baskets made from the raffia and reeds.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Basketry.

Basketry.

Basketry is one of the oldest handicrafts known to man.


Basketry.

Basketry is one of the oldest handicrafts known to man, but it reached its greatest excellence with the tribes of American Indians who wove baskets from the grasses, reeds and rushes which they gathered as they wandered from place to place in their nomadic life. These materials were colored with dyes made by cooking the bark of certain trees and the roots and bulbs of plants, a knowledge of which was handed down from mother to daughter.


BEGINNING A BASKET IN ANY WEAVE.

The designs were not meaningless, but represented by symbols their prayers to the Deity for rain, success to a war party, or a petition for favorable crops. Or it might be they chronicled the victory over a hostile tribe, a maiden's love for a stalwart brave, or a thousand other events of their lives in conventionalized symbolic form. The shape, size and use varied as much as the design.

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture

5 Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture



5. Avoid over-crowding the rooms with furniture and cluttering with too many pictures and useless and inartistic bric-a-brac, and dust-collectors.

6. The Care of the Home: This topic will enable the teacher to give many helpful suggestions. Assign sub-divisions of the subject to different members of the class:

a. Sweeping.
b. Dusting.
c. Care of bare floors.
d. Window washing.
e. Dish washing.
f. Care of cupboards.
g. Care of book-shelves, daily papers, magazines, etc.
h. Care of sleeping rooms, beds, etc.
i. Care of bath rooms.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

An Imaginary Home.

An Imaginary Home.

An Imaginary Home.


When furnishing a home take into consideration sanitary conditions, use, convenience, economy and artistic effects.

1. Ask pupils to make clippings of house plans from papers, magazines, etc. Study and compare them.

2. Decide upon a plan for a simple house, and have some member of the class draw the floor plans upon the blackboard where it can remain for a time.

3. Several points must be considered in conjunction, that there may may be harmony throughout the house as the rooms open into each other.

a. The color scheme and design for each room. Some samples of cloth or paper to show the exact colors and combinations of colors decided upon.
b. Decoration of the walls.
c. The floor finish or covering.
d. Color of shades and curtains that the outside may present a favorable appearance.

4. Divide the class into sections and assign a room to each section to suggest detail in style of furnishing and decorating.

a. Living Room.
b. Dining Room.
c. Kitchen.
d. Pantry.
e. Hall.
f. Sleeping Rooms.
g. Bath.
h. Laundry.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Depending upon their needs and environment

Depending upon their needs and environment

Depending upon their needs and environment



Every teacher will invent her own method of reaching her particular class, depending upon their needs and environment, using all necessary tact. An outline is given below which will suggest a few topics and one method of conducting the lessons. There are many kindred subjects, such as good ventilation, plenty of sunlight, good house-keeping, etc., that can be brought into the discussions, but the enthusiasm which is aroused is really the vital point of the lesson.

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly

The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly



The decoration of the shade may be varied greatly. The design may be drawn upon the back of the cardboard and cut out the same as a stencil, care being taken that the proper bridges are in place. The book-cloth is then pasted on the back. If the cardboard is intended as a framework only, construct a second trapezoid one-half inch inside the other, and cut on the lines. The possibilities for decoration are limitless. A design may be stenciled, embroidered, or worked with any of the fancy stitches upon any thin material through which the light will shine, and then pasted over the back of the frame-work. Fancy silks are also very effective.

When the sections are finished, fasten them together with the passe-partout paper. Lay them all face downward with the sides to be joined placed as closely together as possible, and stick the moistened paper over adjoining edges. Book-cloth or any firm material can be used instead of the passe-partout paper.


A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.

A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.

A Four Sided, Collapsible Candle or Lamp Shade.


Materials: Cardboard; book-cloth or Japanese tissue paper; passe-partout paper.

Cut a pattern of one section of the shade in the form of a trapezoid having the longer parallel five and seven-eighth inches, the shorter parallel one and three-eighth inches and the altitude four and one-half inches. Candle shadeholders are uniform in size being six and one-half inches in circumference. To fit this circular holder, the shade may be rounded out at the top, although it can be used with the straight edge. Cut a strip of cardboard five inches wide, and from this cut the four sides of the shade.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Picture Framing.

Picture Framing.

Picture Framing.


Select a mount of the proper color for the picture to be used, and passepartout paper to harmonize. Cut to the desired size and shape. Cut a piece of cardboard to the same size. Have a glass cut to the size of the mount, also a mat for the picture, if desired. Place the picture in position on the mount, and draw guide lines to aid in pasting the picture in place. Put the two rings used for the purpose of hanging the picture, into the cardboard back before putting the parts together. The rings should be placed exactly even, measuring down from the top about one-third of the width of the picture, and in at the sides one inch. Clean the glass carefully, and place it over the picture. Between the cardboard back and the picture place two or three layers of newspaper. Be sure that the back is placed with the rings toward the top. Tie all together very tightly with a strong cord, passing the cord only around one way of the picture. Cut the passepartout paper the length of the picture and crease it over the edges. Moisten the paper and stick it first to the glass and then draw it firmly over the edge and down on the cardboard back. It is necessary to work rapidly after the paper is moistened. Finish the other edge in the same manner. Before removing the cord, tie another around the other way. Finish the two ends in the same manner as the sides, with the exception of the corners. Cut the passe-partout paper an inch longer than the side to be covered, and do not fasten down quite to the corner. Trim for a mitered corner on the glass side and cut a narrow strip the thickness of the glass, and stick it down along the other edge. Tie a cord into the rings for hanging.


Sunday, October 19, 2014

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches

Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches



Draw on the book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches, which will leave a margin of one-half inch. Put the glue on the cloth and place the pulp board five by eight inches over the oblong. Turn over the edges and finish. Glue the lining paper in place. Place under weight as soon as finished. The front cover is made the same with the exception of a joint in the pulp board. Draw on the second piece of book-cloth an oblong five by eight inches. Draw a line one inch from and parallel to one end of the oblong. Draw a second line one-fourth of an inch from this. Spread the glue on the cloth and place the two pieces of pulp board on the oblong with a quarter-inch space between them, and proceed as before. Both covers can be made with the joint if desired. Punch with the eyelet tool two holes in each cover three inches apart and one-half inch from the edge, and put in the eyelets. Take care that these holes are directly opposite. Cut the paper for the book into sheets four and one-half by seven and three-fourths inches (or four and one-half by fifteen and one-half inches), and fold. Punch the eyelets exactly even with those in the cover. Place a postal-card three and one-half by five and one-half inches on the sheets with a half-inch margin at top, bottom and end, and make two points on each of the four sides, one one-half inch from the corner, and the other one inch. Connect corresponding points by slant lines and cut with a knife on these lines. The outside cover can be decorated in any way desired. This style of cover can be used for a book of any size or shape.


TWO VIEWS OF A POST CARD ALBUM CLOSED AND OPEN.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

A Postal Card Album.

A Postal Card Album.

A Postal Card Album.


Materials: Paper for leaves of book; pulp board in three pieces, 5" × 8", 5" × 6¾", 5" × 1"; book-cloth in two pieces 6" × 9"; lining paper in two pieces 4¾" × 7¾"; glue; eyelet punch and eyelets.


TWO VIEWS OF A POST CARD ALBUM CLOSED AND OPEN.

To be of value the work in this exercise must be exact, with measurements perfectly accurate. The glue is to be used sparingly and spread upon the cloth and not on the pulp board.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Follow the directions for making the cover of

Follow the directions for making the cover of

Follow the directions for making the cover of



Follow the directions for making the cover of the "Blank Book with Paper Cover Re-inforced with Cloth," . The envelopes take the place of the sheets of paper and are fastened in place as follows:

1. On the back and front of the envelopes draw a line parallel to and one-half inch from the bottom.

2. Fold a strip of book-cloth one inch by nine and one-half inches through the center the long way.

3. Glue one-half of this folded strip to the half-inch below the line on the back of one envelope and the other half to the half-inch below the line on the front of another envelope. Continue thus until the four envelopes are fastened together.

4. Glue half of a strip of the cloth to the front of the first envelope and the other half to the front of the cover to hold in the desired position. Do the same at the back.

5. Glue in the lining papers on the covers.

The outside may be decorated as desired.


CLIPPING CASE.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Clipping Case.

Clipping Case.

Clipping Case.


Materials: 4 envelopes, 41/8" × 9½"; 4 strips of book-cloth 9½" × 1"; 1 strip of book-cloth 10" × 3½"; 4 pieces of book-cloth 2" × 1¼"; heavy felt paper 9" x 10"; 2 sheets lining paper 4¼" x 9½"; glue. Put the glue on the cloth each time with tooth-picks.


CLIPPING CASE.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Fold the half-inch strip of book-cloth through the center

Fold the half-inch strip of book-cloth through the center

Fold the half-inch strip of book-cloth through the center



It is necessary to trim the edges of the flaps that there may be no difficulty in folding one over another. Measure one-half inch from the corners of the flaps and connect this point with the corner of the square, and cut on these lines. Fold the half-inch strip of book-cloth through the center; place the glue on the cloth and glue it for a binding around the raw edges of the case. Finish the corners of the binding with the square or mitered corner. Fold the fastening strap over the opposite side, and place a point at the corners to locate the place where the slit is to be cut. Connect these two points by a straight line and draw another parallel to, and three-fourths of an inch from it. Cut on these lines with a knife. This slit must be strengthened by the book-cloth. Cut a piece two and three-fourths inches by one and one-fourth inches and glue over the strip on the wrong side; clip the edges at the ends of the slit, and bring through to the right side, and glue them down. The piece for the covering of the right side may be cut the exact width of the slit, and the ends cut in some fancy shape. This may be cut from the cloth, or the paper used in the design. The front of the case can be decorated as desired. Very beautiful effects can be obtained by cutting out the design from paper that harmonizes in color and gluing it on. This makes a very useful case for holding school papers, and if neatly and carefully done, is an excellent exercise.


CLIPPING CASE.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Thus forming an eight-and-a-half inch square in the center

Thus forming an eight-and-a-half inch square in the center

Thus forming an eight-and-a-half inch square in the center



On the wrong side, find the center of the paper twenty inches by fifteen inches by drawing both diagonals. Measure four and one-fourth inches from the center toward the sides. Draw straight lines passing through these points connecting opposite sides, thus forming an eight-and-a-half inch square in the center. Cut out the four corners on these lines. Fold in the four sides on the lines of the square. A strap, which will fasten the case by slipping through a slit cut in the opposite side, is to be made on one of the long flaps as follows:

Place a point at the middle on the edge of the flap, and measure an inch along the edge on both sides of this point. Measure down two inches from these last points and place dots. Connect these dots by straight lines with the top and sides. Cut the corners out on these lines. Trim the end of the strap to a point beginning one-half inch from the corners and cutting to the center point.

A Folding Envelope Case For Papers.

A Folding Envelope Case For Papers.

A Folding Envelope Case For Papers.


Materials: Strong felt paper, or its substitute; (a sheet 20" × 30" cut through the center the short way will make two cases. If two harmonious colors be selected, the corners cut from one case can be used to decorate another); book cloth in one-inch strips for binding; glue. Use tooth-picks in applying the glue.


BACK AND FRONT VIEWS OF A FOLDING ENVELOPE CASE FOR PAPERS.

Monday, October 13, 2014

A Blank Book With Paper Cover Re-inforced With Cloth.

A Blank Book With Paper Cover Re-inforced With Cloth.

A Blank Book With Paper Cover Re-inforced With Cloth.



A BLANK BOOK.

Materials: Strong felt paper 9" × 10"; book cloth for back 10" × 3¼", for corners 4 pieces 2" × 1¾"; lining paper for covers, 2 sheets 4¼" × 9½"; number of sheets of paper desired for the book 8½" × 9½"; coarse thread; coarse needle; glue. Use tooth-picks in applying the glue.

Connect these points with straight lines



Draw a line on the felt paper through the middle the long way and fold on the line. Measure on the outside one and one-fourth inches from the corners along both edges, and place points. Connect these points with straight lines. Place the long edge of the cloth corner to this line, and fold it over the corner and crease. Remove and trim it even before gluing on. Put the glue always on the cloth and use as little as possible. Crease the strip of book-cloth for the back, through the center, but do not glue in place until after the leaves are sewed in. Fold the sheets of paper through the center of the book. Follow the same directions for sewing the leaves together as given in the description of "A Child's Picture Book," . Finish by gluing the paper lining on the inside of the cover and the strip of book-cloth down the back.

This book could be made any size or shape, and decorated as desired.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Find the center of the card by drawing both diagonals

Find the center of the card by drawing both diagonals

Find the center of the card by drawing both diagonals



Find the center of the card by drawing both diagonals. Measure two and one-half inches from the center toward the sides. Draw straight lines passing through these points connecting opposite edges, thus forming a five-inch square in the center. Cut out the corners on these lines. Hold the edge of a ruler firmly to the lines of the square and bend the cardboard. Fold the strip of cloth or tape through the center and put the glue on this, using very little, and taking care to keep it back from the edge. Cover the corners with the cloth. Cut a strip of the colored paper twenty-one inches by two and three-fourth inches. Put a very little glue on the outside of the box and cover with the colored paper. Turn over the edges and glue them down. Follow the same directions for making the cover, measuring two and five-eighth inches from the center of the seven-inch square of cardboard. Cover the sides and top with the colored paper, the strip for the sides being twenty-two inches by one and one-half inches, and the top a five-inch square. This box can be made in any size or shape, the same general plan being followed.

Saturday, October 11, 2014

A Box With Cover.

A Box With Cover.

A Box With Cover.


Materials: Cardboard for foundation 9" × 9"; cover 7" × 7"; colored paper for covering; strips of cloth or glue-tape for staying corners; glue. Use tooth-picks in applying the glue.


NO. 1 AND NO. 2 ONE-PIECE BOXES.
NO. 3. TWO-PIECE BOX. BOX AND COVER ALIKE.

GROUP OF BOXES.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Mark three holes on the fold with the needle

Mark three holes on the fold with the needle

Mark three holes on the fold with the needle



1. Mark three holes on the fold with the needle, one in the middle and one two inches above it, and another two inches below it.

2. Tie a large knot two inches from the end of the thread.

3. Insert the needle at the lowest hole, from the inside, and draw it through leaving two inches of the thread to tie.

4. Pass over the middle hole and down through the upper one, out through the middle hole on one side of the long thread, and back through the same hole on the other side of the thread, and tie the two ends of the thread together.

Paste a pretty card or large picture on the outside for the cover. Page the book with neat figures and write the name of the child for whom the book is designed on the inside of the cover. Arrange and paste in the pictures neatly.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Paper, cloth and cardboard construction.

Paper, cloth and cardboard construction.

Paper, cloth and cardboard construction. A Child's Picture Book.


A Child's Picture Book.


Materials: Pink, blue or yellow paper cambric 27 inches; coarse thread; coarse needle; bright, pretty pictures which the children have cut from papers, magazines, cards, etc.; paste.

Fold the cloth through the center with the warp and cut on the fold. Fold both strips into three equal pieces with the woof, and cut. Fold each piece through the center parallel to the selvedge. Place two pieces together and pin at the fold, and "pink" through the four thicknesses, around the edges with a "pinking iron." Do the same with the other pieces. When finished place them all together and stitch at the fold at follows:

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Give careful heed to the selection of color

Give careful heed to the selection of color

Give careful heed to the selection of color



Give careful heed to the selection of color, not only to the dress but to the accessories, hat, gloves, collar, belt and shoes, as well. In fact, consider the costume as a whole made up of parts, each one of which must harmonize with every other.

Before sewing machines were to be found in every home and ready made clothing in the stores styles did not change so rapidly. Commercial conditions now make it to the advantage of a great army of people that the styles in dress change often and radically. The manufacturers of cloth, the wholesale merchants with their agents, the retailers and their numerous clerks, wholesale garment-makers and their many employes, pattern-makers, dress-makers, milliners and the manufacturers of all minor articles of clothing are all benefitted by this oft recurring change in style. This condition has come about so gradually that we hardly realize to what extent we are victims of trade-tricks. It is not necessary nor desirable that woman should enslave herself to follow all the vagaries of style.


CHILD'S PICTURE BOOK.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

A short stout person should avoid plaids

A short stout person should avoid plaids

A short stout person should avoid plaids



Some colors and styles are becoming to certain complexions and forms and are quite the reverse to others. A short stout person should avoid plaids, while one overly tall should never select stripes. The lines of the garment are equally important any method of trimming that gives length, the long lines of the "princess" and the "empire" styles are a boon to the short figure, while the overskirt, the deep flounce, and the bands of trimming running around the skirt, all help to break the long lines for the tall woman. Belts that by contrast divide the figure are not good unless one wishes to shorten the height. Waists and skirts of the same color usually have more style and give better form.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy



"Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy," wrote Shakespeare, and the advice still holds good. Economy does not consist, however, of buying cheap, shoddy material. Trimming can be dispensed with to the improvement of the average garment, but a dress made of good cloth will out-wear, look better, give greater self-respect, and in the end cost less than several dresses made of cheap stuff, as the cost of making is no more for the one than the other. This is a principle that applies as well to underwear. Simple garments, well made of firm fine cambric are much to be preferred to those overtrimmed with cheap lace and sleazy embroidery.

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Neatness should be considered above beauty or style

Neatness should be considered above beauty or style

Neatness should be considered above beauty or style



Neatness should be considered above beauty or style. A soiled collar, hooks, eyes and buttons missing, gloves out at finger ends, shoes dusty and unpolished, braid hanging from the skirt, the waist and skirt separated are all accidents which may befall anyone, but are most deplorable when they become chronic.

It has been wisely said that the best dressed woman is she of whose clothing one is unconscious, whose dress is neither conspicuous from extreme style nor too noticeable from a total disregard of the custom of the times. Good taste demands that one be not overdressed. Street and business suits and young girls' school dresses should be plain, well made and neat, of subdued and becoming color.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

While a due regard to the opinions of

While a due regard to the opinions of

While a due regard to the opinions of



While a due regard to the opinions of others demands a certain conformity to the customs of the time and place in which one lives, there is always a latitude allowed which enables one to exercise individual needs, taste and preference.

Health and comfort should take rank before everything else. A style which interferes with either is an absurdity which anyone of good sense will avoid.

Friday, October 3, 2014

Clothing was first designed in the early ages

Clothing was first designed in the early ages

Clothing was first designed in the early ages



Clothing was first designed in the early ages, no doubt, as a covering and protection to the body; it has come, however, to mean something more than this. It is an expression of the character, the nicety of taste or lack of it the discrimination and judgment of the individual. In the selection of one's garments there are a number of points which must be taken into consideration, such as health and comfort, cost, fitness, color and style, as well as beauty. And above all, the average woman must pause and consider last season's garments, that are too good to be discarded and must form a part of this year's wardrobe. It is quite disastrous to plunge ahead and buy a blue dress, because blue happens to be stylish, if the hat to be worn with it is a green or brown "left over."

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Art on paper is the preparation for a journey packing the suitcase

Art on paper is the preparation for a journey packing the suitcase

Art on paper is the preparation for a journey packing the suitcase



Art on paper is the preparation for a journey packing the suitcase, as it were, necessary but toilsome; the application of art principles to the problems of real life, the delightful excursion, opening the eyes to real beauty and its possibilities. May the children in our schools have something more than the drudgery of preparation.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

An artist who paints the human figure

An artist who paints the human figure

An artist who paints the human figure



An artist who paints the human figure, draws and erases and draws again, and yet again, that the contour of the form he creates may be right in proportion and graceful in line. He studies his coloring, he compares, rejects and blends for a particular shade or tint that makes for complete harmony. No discordant note of color nor turn of line that detracts from the beauty of the whole is allowed. And there are artistic makers-of-garments who put into the costumes they create the same thought and care that the artist spends upon his canvas, but the prices of both are within the reach of very few. Nearly every woman must plan her own wardrobe and choose the furnishings for her home and this is what "Art" and "Domestic Art" in the public schools should train the girl of to-day the woman of the future to do.